Playing with shirt sleeve cuffs

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For the last two Fridays I’ve been at an established craft club called ‘Crafty Chat’.  There are fifteen regulars who meet every Friday from 11am-1pm and once a month, they meet up from 11-3 and bring along lunch or use the kitty money for fish and chips.  I took my mum this week as she recently lost a friend and I thought it might take her mind off things for a couple of hours.  Sadly, I won’t be able to go as of next week due to work commitments, but I will definitely consider booking my annual leave so that I can go once in a while to the longer Friday session.

I did a short demo on wrist knitting.  It’s great to see that the lady I was teaching picked up the technique really quickly and didn’t end up in a tangled mess.  She paints garden gnomes for people and has began jewellery making, using ring pulls from tin cans.

ImageThis is a scarf I made a while ago, knitted with my wrists.  I had some left over yarn to give my demo, which intrigued the group.  It led to a discussion on whether you can take knitting needles on the plane, to which came the reply by someone that as long as your project is already started and you carry it in a clear plastic bag, that’s OK.  With wrist knitting, you could knit away without worrying!  I blogged about this method of knitting in an earlier posting.

So what did I make yesterday?  I took along my 39 Squares project and sewing silks.  I wanted to try out a new craft though.  Before I left the house, I cut off one of the cuffs from a shirt that I hardly ever way.  I was inspired by this cuff that was sent to me from a pen pal friend who lives in France – made from wet felting techniques and handstitched.  

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First, I stitched patchwork pieces to the front and back of the cuff as it was plain white – I want to try a patterned one next, but obviously a white canvas means you can test the waters and get creative!

I added felt, buttons, wool and beads.  The cuff fits perfectly and the colours are delicate, which is great for summer outings as a statement piece of jewellery and doesn’t cost much to produce if you have some old shirts or blouses lying around.

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